Book review: Chiaro, D. & Baccolini, R. (eds.). (2014). Gender and Humour: Interdisciplinary and International Perspectives. New York: Routledge.

Mostafa Abedinifard

Abstract


Book review: Chiaro, D. & Baccolini, R. (eds.). (2014). Gender and Humour: Interdisciplinary and International Perspectives. New York: Routledge.

Keywords


Humour; Gender; Humour Studies; Feminist Humour Studies; Critical Humour Studies

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References


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Bing, J. (2004). ‘Is feminist humour an oxymoron?’. Women and Language 27 (1), pp. 22–33.

Connell, R. (2009). Gender in World Perspective (2nd ed.). Cambridge, UK: Polity.

Davis, M. S. (1995). ‘The sociology of humour: A stillborn field?’. Sociological Forum 10 (2), pp. 327–339.

Ferree, M. M. (2004). ‘Soft repression: Ridicule, stigma, and silencing in gender-based movements’. Research in Social Movements, Conflicts & Change 25, pp. 85–101.

Gerschick, T. (2005). ‘Masculinity and degrees of bodily normativity in western culture’, in Kimmel, S., Hearn, J. & Connell, R. W. (eds.), Handbook of Studies in Men and Masculinities, Thousand Oaks, CA.: Sage, pp. 367–378.

Kuipers, G. (2008). ‘The sociology of humour’, in Raskin, V. (ed.), The Primer of Humour Research, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, pp. 361–398.

Lockyer, S. & Pickering, M. (2008). ‘You must be joking: The sociological critique of humour and comic media’. Sociology Compass 2 (3), pp. 808–820.

Weaver, S. (2011). The Rhetoric of Racist Humour: US, UK, and Global Race Joking. Surrey: Ashgate.


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