The progress of Australian humour in Britain

John Christopher Davies

Abstract


There has long been a close link between both the comedy and, by implication, the sense of humour of British and Australians. Such distinctively British radio and television programs as Hancock's Half Hour and Till Death Do Us Part found their main overseas market in Australia rather than in other English-speaking countries. Americans either did not find them funny or else were not allowed to find them funny, or provided feeble imitations such as Archie Bunker. Only the Australians were able and willing to share the British sense of humour. The other side of this relationship is that Australian comedians such as Dick Bentley, Joy Nicholls, Bill Kerr, Rolf Harris, Barry Humphries and Kevin Bloody Wilson, having succeeded in Australia, have gone on to be successful in Britain as well. Clearly the same formulae work in both countries.


Keywords


Jokes; Australia; Britain; boundaries; mateship; masculinity; vomit

Full Text:

VIEW FULL TEXT HERE

References


Afferbeck Lauder (1965). Let Stalk Strine. Sydney: Ure Smith.

Afferbeck Lauder (1969). Fraffly Strine. Sydney: Ure Smith.

Aitchison, J. & Chan, T. (1995). Revenge of the Sarong Party Girl. Singapore: Angsana.

Aitchison, J. & Chan, T. (1996). The SPG Rides Again. Singapore: Angsarii.

Blackman, J. (1991). Don't Come the Prawn, the Aussie Phrase Book. Sydney: Sun.

Bowles, C. (1986). G'Day, Teach Yourself Australian. North Ryde: Angus and Robertson.

Buzo, A. (1994). Kiwese. Port Melbourne: Mandarin.

Conway, R. (1974). The Great Australian Stupor: An Interpretation of the Australian Way of Life. Melbourne: Sun.

Davies, C. (1990). Ethnic Humour Around the World: A Comparative Analysis. Bloomington Indiana: Indiana UP.

Davis, A.F.& Encel, S. (eds.) (1965). Australian Society. London: Pall Mall.

Davis, I.-I. & Crofts, P. (1988), 'Humour in Australia', in A Ziv (ed.) National Styles of Humour, New York: Greenwood, pp. 1–29.

Edwards, J. (1985), Talk Tidy. Cambridge, Wales: D. Brown.

Hudson, B. & Pickering, L. (1987). The First Australian Dictionary of Vulgarities and Obscenities. Devon: Newton Abbott.

Humphries, B. (1993). More Please. Ringwood: Penguin.

Humphries, B. & Garland, N. (1968). The Wonderful World of Barry McKenzie. London: Macdonald.

Humphries, B. & Garland, N. (1972). Bazza Pulls it Off. More Adventures of Barry McKenzie. London: Private Eye and Andre Deutsch.

Humphries, B. & Garland, N. (1988). The Complete Barry McKenzie. London: Methuen.

Kerr, Bill, Artist's File 1 (1947–52), January 1951, BBC Written Archive, Caversham.

Kerr, Bill, Artist's File 2 (1953–62), BBC Written Archive, Caversham.

Les Patterson, Dr. Sir (1986). The Traveller's Tool. London: Hodder Coronet.

O'Grady, J. (Nino Culotta) (1965). Aussie English. Sydney: Ure Smith.

O'Grady, J. (Nino Culotta) (1971). Aussie Etiket. Sydney: Ure Smith.

Oxley, H.G. (1978). Mateship in Local Organisation. St Lucia: University of Queensland Press.

Raskin, V. (1985). Semantic Mechanisms of Humor. Dordrecht: D. Reidel.

Singh Uberoi, J.P. (1967). Sihhuism and Indian Society, Transactions of the Indian Institute of Advanced Study. Simla: Rashtrapati Nivas.

Wilson, K.B. (1994). Blackout from the Outback (audio-cassette). Northampton.




DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7592/EJHR2017.5.4.davies

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.


Publication ethics and malpractice statement