15th International Pragmatics Conference (IPra2017), 16-21 July 2017, Belfast, Northern Ireland

Władysław Chłopicki

Abstract


Academic event report on 15th International Pragmatics Conference (IPra2017), 16-21 July 2017, Belfast, Northern Ireland


Keywords


pragmatics; humour

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References


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