Book review. Chen, Li-Chi Lee (2017). Taiwanese and Polish Humor: A Socio-Pragmatic Analysis. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

Konrad Magdziarz

Abstract


The  entry Taiwanese and Polish Humor: A Socio-Pragmatic Analysis is an attempt at comparing and contrasting the uses of humour occuring in spoken interactions in two subjectively different cultures.

Keywords


Taiwanese Humour, Polish Humour, Conversation Analysis, Multimodal Dicourse Analysis, Interactional Linguistics

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References


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Chen, Li-Chi Lee (2017). Taiwanese and Polish Humor: A Socio-Pragmatic Analysis. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

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